AccenTraining Podcast

#110 Compare your I and E Sounds

April 18, 2022 Patrick Season 5 Episode 110
AccenTraining Podcast
#110 Compare your I and E Sounds
Show Notes Transcript

The English language has sounds that may not exist in your first language. Likewise, your first language also has sounds which don't exist in English.
For this reason, people often mix I and E sounds considering one may be familiar to you, while the other is not. Repeat after me as we explore the subtle differences between I and E in spoken English using the sets of words below.

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Feel your muscle position as we practice these sets of words:
Read v Rid v Red  |    Deed v Did v Dead  |  Beat v Bit v Bet  |  Seat v Sit v Set  |  Feel v Fill v Fell 

Speaker 1:

Welcome to the accent training podcast, a podcast where I teach you the essentials of speaking with an American accent. I teach you the movements that we use to create the sounds that Americans make when they're speaking. And I give you handful of phrases that you can easily work into your daily life to use. Those sounds kind of get used to them, adjust them for your own speech. My name is pat I'm from Canada. I'm from Toronto. I do live in Mexico. My dog SASA is here to join me today. SASA is not going to help with this podcast because she's a dog, but she's gonna hang out with me here, just laying on the ground. She didn't wanna leave the room. And I thought that's just fine. I could use a little company, but let's get to the good stuff. Let's get to what we are here for today. Because today we're just gonna have a brief episode for you to practice a little vowel sound exercise with me here. I'd just like you to repeat these after me. The sounds that we're gonna talk about are gonna be the sounds E a and a E a a three sounds which once again, people all over the world mix up and it's total understandable as to why these three sounds, these three vowel sounds are very close in their positions and have minimal differences between them. And so if any of these sounds don't exist in your native language, it's entirely possible that you would replace it with another one of these sounds. So let's see how we can get a feel for these first off. I'd like you to repeat after me this sound E E feel how, when you say E the back of your tongue is pressing up, it's pressing upwards towards your top teeth in the back. E E. Now here's the thing about that E sound, no matter how hard you press your tongue towards your teeth, E you get that same kind of sound E E now let's hold that same position. Let's hold that same as we have with the E, but let's now take away that pressure. So same position. The back of the tongue is touching the teeth in the back, but lightly with no pressure. So instead of getting a strong E E let's take away that pressure, eh , eh , E lots of pressure, eh , no pressure. When we make that, eh , we're not dropping our jaw down. We're not opening our mouth wide. Our teeth are very close together. And as I mentioned, the back of our tongue is just lightly touching our top teeth in the back. Eh , but now let's drop the jaw down a little bit. Let's see what we get when we drop the jaw. So first E very tight teeth close together, tongue making lots of pressure. E we release the pressure, eh , eh , and then we drop the jaw, eh , eh , we kinda have our tongue around the middle of our mouth. We're not lifting it up high, Justin . Eh , so does sound. If we lift it up too high, we're gonna get an a , a , and we're not working on that one today, but E eh , here's our exercise for today. Repeat after me a whole bunch of words here using those three sounds. Then we're gonna wrap it up nice episode and trust me, get the hang of this now. And it's gonna set you up for success with an episode that I have coming up very soon. I N G endings. So repeat after me, we're gonna go over a bunch of sets of words here to enhance our use of this. Read. Read lots of pressure, red, red, same position, no pressure between my tongue and teeth, red, red, red dropping my jaw down. Add red, read red , red. All right . Repeat these next three after me deed E deed , dead , dead , dead, eh , dead . Let's see another three beat bit be here's another three to repeat after me folks seat . Lots of pressure between the tongue and teeth there. Seat sit, sit. Same position, no pressure. Sit , eh , set , set , dropping the jaw just a little bit. Not too much. Just a little sad . And here's just three more to repeat after me here. These ones, I hear a lot of people mix up, feel, fill , fail . I'll repeat those. Once more, those ones I think are quite important. Feel lots of pressure feel . And finally, so like I said, very quick episode today, that's it. That's today's episode, just a couple of quick exercises for you to get the hang of this. A Sam have another episode to follow up with this one very shortly, where we take that a and we put it to work with the NNG mm , ING ING that's to come very soon. Probably this week. Actually, I , I could probably get that one out this week. So stay tuned in make sure that you hit subscribe if you haven't already. And you will know, as soon as I've got that episode out to follow up with it, along with the plethora of useful sent lessons to come along in the future, practice this exercise for now, check the description, and you can find these sets of words, read them out, get the hang of those sounds for yourself. Repeat those sets out again and again, and again, a hundred times, let your muscle adjust to those positions. If you allow your muscles and your ears to adjust to that sound, E then they will distinguish better from the sound, eh , and when they get good at that, eh , then they'll be able to pick out the difference between eh , and a , and all of your spoken English will thrive as a result. So hit subscribe. If you wanna learn more things like this in the future, keep an eye out for more episodes to come. Thank you for tuning on in today and have a good one folks.